Thursday Thought: I’m always just a little wrinkly

I was clothes shopping with a friend, and I asked her how she would keep a jumper I was trying on non-wrinkly. Would she really iron it all of the time? She said, “Oh no, I’m just always a little wrinkly.”

A few days later, I was noticing myself feeling so down about all of my perceived short-comings, and this thought came to me, “I’m just always a little wrinkly.” It came to me in her tone of voice that said, “I love your wrinkles. You are just fine. You aren’t meant to be pristine and perfectly ironed. This life is all about having wrinkles and loving them, and loving other people’s wrinkles too. We’re all just a little bit wrinkly.”

I hope you can love your wrinkles today.

P.S. If you like these posts and are interested in getting some more personal help with your struggles or seeing your amazingness. I’d love for you to sign-up for a free coaching session. You don’t have to come prepared or have anything necessarily to say. I will ask you questions and guide you the whole time. I’d love to meet you!

One Thought Does Not Fit All

Thoughts are like clothes. They fit differently for different people. You know that friend that dresses so cute, and then you try on her clothes, and even if they fit your body, you don’t feel very good in them?

Thoughts are like that. I may share a thought here that sounds so nice, and really works for me, or for one of my clients. You may try it on, but every time you think it you feel not quite right.

I want you to know that doesn’t mean you’re doing something wrong. It just means that thought isn’t for you. That doesn’t mean thought work isn’t for you; it just means it’s not a helpful thought…for you.

So how do you know if a thought fits? Notice how it makes you feel. Remember: circumstances trigger thoughts, which create feelings that drive our actions, which give us our results.

You know a thought is helpful when it creates a feeling in you that drives actions or behaviours that get you the results that you want.

P.S. If you like these posts and are interested in getting some more personal help with your struggles or seeing your amazingness. I’d love for you to sign-up for a free coaching session. You don’t have to come prepared or have anything necessarily to say. I will ask you questions and guide you the whole time. I’d love to meet you!

Thursday Thought: I get to believe whatever I want to about myself

What do you think about yourself? I want you to get a piece of paper and write down the story you believe about yourself.

Your brain is going to tell you that this story is true. I want to offer to you that it is just a story. Think about a woman that stays in an abusive relationship because she tells herself that she doesn’t deserve any better. Is her story true? Of course not. Of course she deserves to be treated with dignity and respect.

Did you know you get to believe whatever you want to about yourself? I give you permission right now. 

Now write the story you WANT to believe about yourself. What if it’s possible that this story is just as true as your original story? I’m telling you it is. Right now. Tell me how it is already true.
P.S. If you like these posts and are interested in getting some more personal help with your struggles or seeing your amazingness. I’d love for you to sign-up for a free coaching session. You don’t have to come prepared or have anything necessarily to say. I will ask you questions and guide you the whole time. I’d love to meet you!

When You Need a Cheerleader

One time I was in a marriage seminar where they said, “You should be your spouse’s cheerleader. There are enough critics out there; you don’t need to be that for your spouse.” Which I think is super great advice IF you’re using it for you and how you want to be. However, on this particular occasion, I thought, “Yes, I just need Steve to be my cheerleader.”

I remember talking to him so many times, trying to explain to him how I needed him to be my cheerleader and how to do it. Guess what, it never worked. This is not because he is inept at being a cheerleader. It’s because I didn’t believe the positive things he said about me, so I hardly even heard them. AND I became very critical of him and his efforts. Ironic.

Then one day I decided to be my own cheerleader. Since, apparently Steve couldn’t do it right (or so I thought), I would have to do it myself. Guess what, I always knew exactly what I wanted to hear. I didn’t believe it at first, but I kept at it, and eventually, I started believing the things I told myself. 

THEN I noticed that Steve WAS cheering me on. He had been cheering me on all along. I just couldn’t hear it because my self-doubt in my head was louder.

Be your own cheerleader first. Then if others happen to be cheering you on, you can enjoy that. But it always starts with you.
P.S. If you like these posts and are interested in getting some more personal help with your struggles or seeing your amazingness. I’d love for you to sign-up for a free coaching session. You don’t have to come prepared or have anything necessarily to say. I will ask you questions and guide you the whole time. I’d love to meet you!

One Way We Add to Our Suffering

During my darkest days, I remember distinctly an evening when I was having an argument with my husband and he said to me, “I’m not going to talk to you if you keep talking the way you are. You’re being disrespectful.” I honestly was shocked by what he had said. I didn’t think I was being disrespectful at all. I felt like I was just stating the facts. I thought and thought on this for a few days. Finally, I tried to see it from his point of view. It was quite humbling. I realized, I thought that because I had thoughts and feelings, it was fine for me to tell them all to him without editing.

I realized that I hadn’t even thought of how he was feeling. I was so engulfed and overwhelmed by my own thoughts and feelings, that I couldn’t even consider his.

I know I was just being human when I was so engulfed in my own problems, but I’m grateful that my husband was willing to say something to me. It must have taken great courage, as I know he loved me and was concerned for me.

I love this quote by the apostle, Elder David A. Bednar, when talking about the character of Christ:

Perhaps the greatest indicator of character is the capacity to recognize and appropriately respond to other people who are experiencing the very challenge or adversity that is most immediately and forcefully pressing upon us. Character is revealed, for example, in the power to discern the suffering of other people when we ourselves are suffering…

https://www2.byui.edu/Presentations/Transcripts/ReligionSymposium/2003_01_25_Bednar.htm

It can be tricky to know how to take care of ourselves while still recognizing we are not the only ones suffering. But I wanted to share this with you in case you are increasing your suffering by blaming others for not taking it away. When we blame others, we are disconnecting from them, which increases our own suffering.

P.S. If you like these posts and are interested in getting some more personal help with your struggles or seeing your amazingness. I’d love for you to sign-up for a free coaching session. You don’t have to come prepared or have anything necessarily to say. I will ask you questions and guide you the whole time. I’d love to meet you!

Thursday Thought: Just because I don’t see, doesn’t mean it’s not there

My coach, Jody Moore, likes to say that confidence isn’t thinking you’re great. Confidence is knowing that you’re great, and you’re not great.

I think this is so powerful to notice about myself AND others. Our human brains like to compare ourselves and each other. We like to kind of decide who’s higher and who’s lower. You’ve heard the phrase, “put her on a pedestal” or “look up to her”.

Ezra Taft Benson gave an amazing sermon on pride. He says that pride isn’t just looking down on someone else. It’s looking UP at someone else, also.

Pride keeps us from confidence. If we think we’re better or somehow less than someone else, we can’t really love ourselves or them.

Just because I don’t see someone else’s struggle, or someone else’s amazingness doesn’t mean it’s not there. Just because I don’t see my own struggle, or my own amazingness, doesn’t mean it’s not there.

P.S. If you like these posts and are interested in getting some more personal help with your struggles or seeing your amazingness. I’d love for you to sign-up for a free coaching session. You don’t have to come prepared or have anything necessarily to say. I will ask you questions and guide you the whole time. I’d love to meet you!

How We Talk to Ourselves

Sometimes we are so mean to ourselves.

We say things like, “Why does your hair look so bad today?”

Or, “Why can’t you be thinner?”

Or “I hate that you yelled at the kids, they’re going to be so traumatized.”

It doesn’t necessarily sound like that in our heads.

It sounds like, “I don’t like my hair.” or “I look fat.” or “I’m a failure.”

If someone else talked to us like that, we wouldn’t want to spend much time with them, if any at all.

What would it look like if you talked to yourself the way you talk to someone you love.

“You look cute today.” or “Thanks for being so nice to me today.”

“Thanks for taking care of my kids today.”

“I know you were tired and irritated, so it means even more that you would stick with it.”

“I know they complained all through dinner, so I wanted you to know that I really appreciate you feeding them.”

“I hope you won’t be too hard on yourself that you lost your temper with the kids. I still love you. I know you’re working on it, and I really appreciate that.”

Notice when you talk to someone you love, you diminish the negative and accentuate the positive.

Speaking kindly to ourselves takes practice. Notice what you wish someone else would say to you, then try saying it to yourself.

I, for one, am glad you are in the world.

P.S. Sign-up for a free one-on-one session and I’ll show you what it looks like to speak kindly to yourself in your specific situation.

Empathy Isn’t About Taking Away The Pain

I taught a class with a fellow coach and friend a little while ago about Empathy. We showed in The Model how empathy is an emotion. Thoughts that lead to empathy are: “I can understand why you would feel that way.” “I have felt that way before.”

It was very intriguing to me, in the class, when one woman gave us an example of something she found difficult. So many of us couldn’t help ourselves but to give her solutions without really understanding HER thoughts and feelings. We were trying to solve her problem with OUR thoughts and feelings.

We were nowhere near the position to be able to help her with her problem. We hadn’t gotten to empathy, yet.

We are empathetic when we listen, ask questions, and really hear THEIR thoughts and feelings, not imagine OUR thoughts and feelings in that situation. Once we REALLY get to empathy, our actions follow easily. Usually, the most helpful thing is to just listen. As humans, once we’ve talked our problems through, we usually have a pretty good idea of what our answer is.

Empathy is being with someone in their pain and struggle, it’s not taking it away.

P.S. The video on the link is an old video. I offer free 45 minute coaching sessions. They’re amazing and will have you seeing clearly what the problem is and what your solution is. Sign-up here if you’re ready to feel better.

 

Thursday Thought: ALL the adults are making it up

When I was a kid, I was excited to be an adult and really know what I’m doing. Then I became an adult, and I realized I don’t know what I’m doing. However, I imagined that everyone around me had life mostly figured out. They seemed confident. Of course, I realized there were some things they were figuring out, but they seemed confident in figuring it out.

My friend said to me the other day, “You know what I realized? ALL of the adults are just making it up.” It totally blew my mind. It’s so true! We all feel confident in some areas, and we all have areas where we don’t feel quite as confident. But even when we feel confident about something, we’re still just deciding to be confident. Confidence comes from our thoughts.

So, if you ever feel like you don’t know what you’re doing, you’re just getting by day-to-day. Just know that…ALL of us adults are just making it up. That’s the fun of being an adult, and sometimes the scary of being an adult.

If you don’t like what you’re making up, and you’d like some help to make up something different, or to feel confident about it, sign-up for a free one-on-one coaching session where I’ll teach you how to create your life on purpose.

Struggling with a Transition? Read on…

This is a picture of my Grandma and me just before I left on a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This was one of the times I remember really struggling with a transition to something new. The day I entered the Missionary Training Center, I thought I felt good, but looking back I realize I just didn’t feel bad. I actually didn’t feel anything. Feeling nothing was better than feeling scared, right?

That first night all of the new missionaries came together for a special meeting with the Mission President. The closing song was “Lord, I Would Follow Thee”. During the hymn I started crying, which was fine until I realized it was becoming uncontrollable. I was in the second row to the front, right where I felt like everyone sitting at the front of the meeting could see me. As we were dismissed, I hurried into the hall, but I wasn’t alone. The Mission President’s wife followed me and hurried me into the first door she could find, which happened to be the custodial closet. She put her arm around me and asked, “Is everything in your life in order?” I was mortified. She thought I was crying because I had done something that I needed to repent of. I don’t blame her. Why else would I be crying so uncontrollably in a public place?

What I didn’t know then, but that I know now, is that big transitions are really hard for me because I have a lot of practiced thoughts about doing new things. I think  thoughts such as: I should know how to do this; Mistakes are bad; Everyone else knows what they’re doing; Others won’t like me if I do this wrong; I’m the only one that doesn’t know what’s going on; I have to do this right.

I’ve never really even articulated those thoughts as what causes my pain. But when I write them down, I can see why they would create so much fear. Thoughts I’m practicing now during transitions are: I don’t need to know how to do this yet, that’s what I’m figuring out; If I already knew how to do this, I would have already done it; Everyone has to figure this out for themselves; No one is born knowing how to do this; I’m willing to do it wrong; There’s probably someone else who would benefit by me asking a question or getting clarification. If you’re struggling through something new, notice what you’re thinking, and try on some of these thoughts.

If you would like some one-on-one help, sign-up for a free coaching session with me. I’ll help you understand what’s so hard, and how to help yourself through it.